Gallery reopening November 7

Collage by artist Linder

The Gallery will reopen on November 7, with the Linder Sterling exhibition, Linderism. There will also be access to the Merz Barn.

To ensure visitor and staff safety through social distancing there will be a one way system.

Visitors will be limited to a maximum capacity of 40 (or 10 in any given space at any time) for the whole Gallery.

An online booking system will be in place (link to follow). It is proposed that the Gallery opening hours will remain the same.

Keep an eye on our Facebook page for further announcements.

Health and Safety measures in the Gallery

New gallery entrance and shop, photo by Colin Davidson

To ensure your safety while visiting the Hatton Gallery a number of measures will have been put in place:

  • All high contact areas such as toilets, handrails, etc will be regularly cleaned throughout opening hours.
  • Signage will be installed on the toilet entrance door, lift and closed access, explaining the current measures.
  • Toilets and lifts will be signposted re usage and staff will be on hand to ensure distancing measures are maintained.
  • Hand sanitiser stations will be available at the entrance and exit to the Gallery, in the toilet and any other additional suitable locations.

A member of staff will greet visitors upon arrival and provide guidance about the visit and what to expect. Along with directional signage, staff will be available to direct visitors on their journey.

Toilets will be deep cleaned each morning and additional cleaning will occur throughout opening hours.

Keep an eye out for further announcements here and on our Facebook page.

Events cancelled due to Corona Virus/Covid 19

Really sad to have to do this but given the latest advice from the government we think it’s right that we cancel all of our planned events until the situation changes.
The events cancelled would therefore be:
  • AGM (April 18th)
  • All talks/lectures/workshops
    • Talk by Dr Mike Collier, The Dawn Chorus
      (31st March)

    • Ruth Bond, Outer Hebrides & Northumberland journey of colour
      (21st April)

    • Rag and Oil method workshop with Jenny Blayney
      (25th April)

  • Summer Exhibition 2020 is cancelled unless things change dramatically in a positive direction by then!

Keep an eye on further announcements here and on our Facebook page.

‘Rag and Oil method’ workshop with Jenny Blayney

Image by Jenny Blayney

Rag and Oil method workshop – Jenny Blayney – Saturday, 25 th April 2.00 to 4.30 pm Learning Room, Hatton Gallery, Newcastle upon Tyne.

Cost £17.00 for members. Jenny will bring materials.

If you would like to come please email Jo Cousin.


Image by Jenny BlayneyI like to work closely with Nature and the Cycle of the Year, tuning in to the mood and reflecting on the inner response through painting.

I run workshops to offer this experience to others, guiding participants through a colour journey, and referring to the changing seasons, often turning to poetry on the theme.

My influences come through the teachings of Rudolf Steiner, seeking the Spirit in Nature as a healing force. I worked as an art therapist in a GP practice for twelve years, following a teaching career, and offering workshops at home and abroad.

My own artwork, including a watercolour veiling method and clay modeling, can be found on my web-site and also as greeting cards.

The workshop at the Hatton will have the spring mood of blossoming and expansion, as the poets love to extol:

“When weeds in wheels look long and lovely and lush”

The painting process, I call the ‘rag and oil method’, begins with rubbing oil colour and linseed oil into strong watercolour paper. The colours begin to blend and move creating a luminous effect, and remaining pliable. The aim is to then bring integration and wholeness in body soul and spirit, thus fostering appreciation and joy and a healing force. The form arises out of the colour.


Jenny will bring leaflets and also some greeting cards for sale.

If you would like to bring a favourite or colour please do so.

If you would like to come please email Jo Cousin


You can find examples of Jenny’s work at: Network Artists website and on her Facebook page.

Renew your membership for 2020

Membership renewals are due on the 1st of January each year. (If you joined after the end of September this year your membership is already valid until 1 January 2021 so you need take no action).

Many have already renewed.

But if you haven’t please choose one of these options:


Paying by Cash Transfer to join or renew for 2020
(our preferred option)

Single: £15                    Family or double: £20           Students (or under 25s): £5

If you have internet banking you can do a simple cash transfer using:

  • FOTH Sort Code: 30-90-50
  • Account Name and Number: Friends of the Hatton 00043391

Please email confirmation of this with your contact details (your full name, address and post code) to our Treasurer, John Dance


 

Paying by Cheque to join or renew for 2020

Single: £15                      Family or double: £20               Students (or under 25s): £5

  • Your full name:
  • Your address:
  • Post Code:
  • Email:
  • Amount enclosed: ……………………  Cheques payable to Friends of the Hatton.

Please indicate your level of  membership and send the following details to:

The FotH Treasurer, John Dance, 41 Trajan Avenue, South Shields, NE33 2AN


 

Note: If you already pay by standing order you need take no action.

If you wish to become a gift aid donor please contact the Treasurer for further details.

Find out how we use your personal data how we use your personal data

W B Hindmarsh – a profile

William Hindmarsh is a self-taught artist who works with several media. He spent his childhood and formative years in rural Northumberland and has been inspired by the landscape and changing moods of the North East coast.

In 1957, at the age of 15, he started work as an apprentice electrician at Linton Colliery and worked in various mines for 12 years, witnessing changes from heavy manual work to advanced automation.

At the age of 18 he won a special prize at the National Coal Board art competition and sold  a painting to Mathias, Spencer & Sons international coal equipment suppliers and the image was circulated world-wide including Russia and America in Iron and Coal Magazine, the depiction of a pit pony giving rise to much comment.

In 2000 he fulfilled a lifetime ambition to become a professional artist.

His subjects vary from landscapes to figurative painting and he enjoys the challenge of different media and subjects, therefore his artwork is diverse and depends on the subject and his inclination at the time.

Depicting his mining experiences prove popular and, as many people can still remember their fathers and grandfathers telling tales of the great northern coalfield, continue to be appreciated.

His one man exhibitions throughout the North East since 2000 including: National Coal Mining Museum, Wakefield, Greenfield Gallery, Newton Aycliffe, Gray College, Durham University, Woodhorn Museum, Northumberland, DLI Museum, Durham, Customs House, South Shields, Town Hall, Bishop Auckland.

image by Bill HindmarshTowards the Light by W B Hindmarsh

His works are now in homes throughout the UK and can be found across the world including USA, Canada, Germany, Australia, Austria and Holland.  The University of Durham has several works and two were bought for the House of Lords extension.  The Mining Art Gallery in Bishop Auckland has several works in their Gemini Collection

Philosophy

“I work continuously to improve my understanding and technique in several media. I am only satisfied when I can communicate successfully with the viewer and when it occurs I call it “magic”.  Without it I feel the work is ordinary. If the viewer is left to add to complete the artwork then this magic is possible.”

St Marks VeniceSt Mark’s, Venice by W B Hindmarsh

Techniques

From his earliest years Hindmarsh has drawn and has read and experimented to improve his knowledge of art.  The academic method of painting, including tempera, was explored but is was the impressionists who continue to influence his work.

When working in watercolours, the paper characteristics, wetness and colour are important and can be unforgiving if overworked. Wet on wet is his favourite method which can surprise and delight.

Pastels and oils are much more forgiving and best when vivid or less subtle work is required. Again the surface of the ground will help determine the communication. To this end, slates, wood board and canvas as a textured ground have been used.”

Current Work

The preparation is underway for a one man exhibition “People and Places” at Greenfield Art Centre in Newton Aycliffe in October 2020, with an eclectic mix of art work with several pieces from private collections showing the variations of his work.

Joint exhibitions are being planned and prepared for with several artists with mining backgrounds displaying their artwork following several successful exhibitions they have held.

His work can be purchased at: NEC Eldon Gardens, Newcastle, The Wallington Gallery, Corbridge, The Kemble Gallery, Durham and Tallantyre Gallery, Morpeth.

For more information see www.williambhindmarsh.co.uk/

March’s Featured Friend – Harry Bell

Harry Bell by his work in the Friends Summer Exhibition 2019

Please tell us a little bit about yourself and your passion for art:
I was born in 1947 and brought up in Gateshead, where I still live.

I’ve always drawn since the time I walked off with an assistant’s pencil stub from the Co-op when I was four and my Dad showed me how to draw cartoon spiders. My route to painting, however, was circuitous, involving several years detour into cartooning for the world of science fiction fanzines (I was Fan Guest of Honour at the World Science Fiction Convention in 1979).

In 1989 I began seriously to paint and, taking early retirement from the Civil Service in 1997, I began a BA (Hons) Fine Art course at Newcastle University, graduating in 2001. I’ve been a professional painter since then.

Can you tell us more about the artwork featured on the title page?
The paintings in the photograph are part of an occasional series based on found still life subjects. I love the careful, but often random arrangements of shoes, hats, bags and other holiday items set out in front of shops and stalls abroad. Given the chance, I like to draw them in my sketchbook (I’ve drawn an awful lot of rows of jars and cans in the Grainger Market) but usually this isn’t possible in the hot sun and busy streets where I find the stalls, so I rely on the photographs I have taken.

At home, I edit the photographs until I’m happy with the composition and even then, the painting itself will determine how closely I follow the original [photographic] source.

Are there any events/exhibitions upcoming that you’re particularly excited about?
I wish I could say so, but at the moment, apart from one or two regular club shows, I have no exhibitions lined up. I’m always on the lookout for opportunities but haven’t been very proactive in this respect in recent years.

Must do better!

What are you currently working on/planning to work on?
I’ve always been fascinated by the effects of time on surfaces, and a few months ago I began painting a series of paintings based on old doors I’ve photographed round the Mediterranean over the years.

I love the distressed paint work, rusted locks and handles of these doors, and using collage and acrylic gels has allowed me to work with the textures and relatively abstract compositions of the subject. From doors, I’ve moved on to walls with torn posters and broken brickwork and most recently, some parcels wrapped in crumpled brown paper.

Unwrapping John Piper by Harry BellUnwrapping John Piper – Mixed media on board, 30×30 cm

Who is your favourite artist and/or what is your favourite art movement?
I wrote my Dissertation on Graham Sutherland and his Pembrokeshire Landscapes and I’ve always loved the Neo-Romantic painters from Paul Nash to John Piper, John Minton, John Craxton and Keith Vaughan.

Someone once said that the ghost of Edward Hopper was sit ting on my shoulder because of my urban landscapes, and I have to say that I’ve never found him a heavy burden. But also across the Atlantic is Wayne Thiebaud, probably the greatest realist painter in the US. At 100 years of age, it’s astonishing that he’s never had a major exhibition in this country. I owe my interest in rows of hats and bags to his series of paintings of pies and cakes.

When did you become a Friend of the Hatton Gallery and why?
I was a Friend for quite some years in the late 80s and early 90s, but lapsed, probably ironically when I went to University. I always found the social events, workshops, weekends away at Ford Castle and the opportunity to show my work in the main galleries (despite the dreadful lighting!) great fun.

I’ve yet to recapture that feeling since I rejoined [two? three?] years ago, mainly because of pressure on my available time.

What is your favourite part of being a Friend of the Hatton Gallery?
Because, as I’ve said, I have limited time available, I’ve not been able to take part in many of FoTH’s events, but I do still enjoy the opportunity to show work, even in the limited space now granted to us, and the chance to meet other members at the preview.

You can see more of Stuart’s work on his website.

If you would like to  be our Featured Friend in a future issue , please email Tomke at FotHevents@gmail.com

Printmaking workshops at the Hatton

Over four Saturdays form late November to early February a number of eager printmakers took part in workshops run by Caroline Coode and myself (Vhairi Cardinal). Some had brought work in progress to print from, others were complete beginners and came in some trepidation. All produced beautiful work along the way and can be rightfully proud of their achievements. This time we introduced screen printing for the first time and some participants found the process rather challenging, but persevered to produce prints on paper and on fabric.

Silkscreen print on a tote bag
Screen print on fabric by a more expereinced printmaker

IMG_4757
Tri-coloured screenprint by a
novice printmaker

Other techniques explored were collagraph (tutored by collagraph queen Caroline), lino cut and engraving on acetate. Some participants brought engraved plates they had made at other workshops.

Different techniques produce different effects.

We are planning to have more workshops in the not too distant future. If you would like to have a go as a beginner, or to develop your practice as an experienced printmaker, we’d love to welcome you to our workshops. Keep an eye on our Facebook page for early announcements.

The cost is not great – currently £20 per day – much less than a day at any other print studio. Come along and spend an enjoyable day with friends and learn, produce and achieve super prints.